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   By SHADI HAMID; MARC LYNCH       The Debate over Syria A rising death toll raises the question: To intervene or not? Why We Must Fight Alongside the Rebels By Shadi Hamid

  LONDON, United Kingdom – More than 100 films about Kurds or by Kurdish filmmakers are being shown at the London Kurdish Film Festival this week. In a statement, the festival’s organizing committee said their objective was “to support the development of Kurdish cinema... films made by Kurdish directors on any subject, and films of a feature, short and documentary style nature, on Kurds, by non-Kurdish directors.” 

  The 2010 edition of the Beirut International Film Festival wound down with a gala award ceremony at Qasr Unesco Wednesday evening. A smattering of prizes were doled out, with top honors going to films from Iraqi Kurdistan and Tunis.

  The Damascus Bureau - 27/7/2010 As the largest ethnic minority in Syria, Kurds were hoping in 2000 that their political, social and cultural rights would be finally recognised under the new president. But the past ten years proved to be disappointing. Despite being a repressed minority in Syria, Syrian Kurds over the last ten years have become more vocal in asserting their political, social and cultural rights, local analysts and political dissidents say.

  Western experts believe Kurds are the real winners of last week’s Turkish election but are skeptical that the new parliament will significantly change the political system. Independent Kurdish candidates won 36 seats in the June 12 parliamentary election, up from 22 seats in the last parliament. Prime Minister Receb Tayyib Erdogan’s Justice and Development Party (AKP) won the most votes, 50 percent, which will give the party about 326 seats.